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Frauds reported in the media – week of August 29th

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Veteran officer uses burner phone to tie up phone scammers’ lines

By: CBC News
Edited by: Investigation Counsel
Date: September 1, 2016

That is what we at Canadian Fraud News Inc. call a true hero: a veteran officer who bought a so-called burner phone to call scammers back. Keith Tauro told CBC News that he used a different name every time he phoned, and his primary objective was to tie up the scammers’ lines. “Because if you’re on the phone with me,” Tauro tells them, “you’re not taking money from someone else.”

Canada Revenue Agency phone scam

Canada has been plagued by a Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) phone scam, getting voicemail messages from someone pretending to be a CRA investigator saying that he owed the government money.

Read the full article at CBC News.
Read more at Canadian Fraud News Inc.

Basic human psychology in fraud: ‘The confidence game’

By: Canadian Fraud News Inc.
Edited by: Investigation Counsel
Date: August 31, 2016

There is a reason why sometimes fraudsters are called ‘scam artists’. Their schemes can be brilliant and will fool even the smartest people into giving away their money. One of the most important steps in scamming someone is gaining their trust, and exactly thát is what fraudsters have mastered.

The best deceivers of our own mind

Confidence and trust are important in a fraud scheme, but there is more. Although different names or terms can be used for the process, a lot of fraud cases fit the characteristics ‘The confidence game’. Basically in every step of this game more material is collected. The manipulated victim becomes more and more committed and involved.

Read more at Canadian Fraud News Inc.

Macklem fraud case and the money that disappeared

By: Canadian Fraud News Inc.
Edited by: Investigation Counsel
Date: August 31, 2016

Last week a self-confessed criminal who fled to Jamaica a decade ago was arrested in Ottawa. Nolan Johnson admitted in 2011 that he was a drug dealer and money launderer but he denied any part in defrauding a disabled man, called Macklem. Instead he blamed his ex-wife Darquise Johnson. Now he insists he does not have the money.

Fraudulently obtained money vanishes

“Losing” the fraudulently obtained money is not unusual in fraud cases. Always ‘follow the money’, as was said in All The President’s Men. If the transactions during the scheme period would be accessible, every fraud case could be solved.

Read more at Canadian Fraud News Inc.

Bank clears victim of fraud’s cheque, then drains her account

By: Global News
Edited by: Investigation Counsel
Date: August 31, 2016

A Toronto woman who was victim of a mail fraud scam has lost her savings. Eighty-two-year-old Leslie Milligan deposited a cheque with TD Bank that was then cleared. But as Sean O’Shea reports, the bank later said the cheque was bogus — and drained her savings.

Fake multi-million payoff

In September, 2015, Milligan received a letter in the mail from a company claiming to be Publishers Clearing House, a direct market company that sells magazine subscriptions and other products. It’s also well known as a sweepstakes company with multi-million dollar payoffs.

Read the full article and video at Global News.
Read more at Canadian Fraud News Inc.

Fraud victim type 2: Heavy technology users known as millennials

By: Canadian Fraud News Inc.
Edited by: Investigation Counsel
Date: August 30, 2016

As Canadian Fraud News mentioned in a previous publication (Blaming the victims article) everybody can fall for a fraud scam. But there are specific types of fraud victims that keep appearing in news articles. In this miniseries we will study every type individually, define the characteristics and discuss their weak spots.

Increasingly online and socially-networked world

Today we will talk about fraud victim type 2: Heavy technology users known as millennials or generation Y. Millennials grew up in an electronics-filled and increasingly online and socially-networked world.

Read more at Canadian Fraud News Inc.

UBC alleges former faculty misused funds for personal gain

By: The Ubyssey
Edited by: Investigation Counsel
Date: August 30, 2016

UBC alleges that its former associate dean of dentistry, Christopher Zed, “personally and inappropriately enriched himself” while acting as a senior dentist in Haida Gwaii. He was employed by UBC’s faculty of dentistry from September 1, 1995 to December 9, 2013.

Employee fraud at dentistry

In 2001, the university participated in the Haida Dental Project on behalf of the UBC faculty of dentistry. At the time, Haida Gwaii had a shortage of dental service providers, with limited part-time care being provided on a fly-in basis. The project’s aim was to solve the shortage by establishing two separate dental clinics. It wound down in 2013, when the clinic’s purposes were fulfilled.

Read the full article at The Ubyssey.
Read more at Canadian Fraud News Inc.

Sperm donor admits he ‘falsified’ information, say Georgia police

By: The Toronto Star
Edited by: Investigation Counsel
Date: August 30, 2016

A man with serious mental illnesses who donated sperm used to create at least 36 children has confessed to police that he provided false information to a sperm bank. Chris Aggeles went to a Georgia police department a week ago to admit to fraud, according to an incident report.

Four Canadian families launched lawsuits against Xytex

Ten families have launched lawsuits against Xytex, alleging the Georgia-based sperm bank misinformed them about their donor. Four of the families are from Canada, five are from the United States and one is from Great Britain.

Read the full article at The Toronto Star.
Read more at Canadian Fraud News Inc.

Canadian Cancer agency spinoff faces fraud allegations

By: South China Morning Post
Edited by: Investigation Counsel
Date: August 29, 2016

A would-be Chinese immigrant businesswoman is suing a troubled BC Cancer Agency spinoff company after a board member allegedly defrauded her out of more than C$200,000 (US$153,422) by promising to help fast-track her immigration application under the Provincial Nominee Program.

Immigration fraud in application

In two lawsuits filed a year apart, plaintiff Yaping Lai claims in BC Supreme Court that Kuen Yu “Joseph” Kwok, a self-described “prominent businessman and a director of several notable companies, including Perceptronix Medical Inc.” defrauded her out of more than C$200,000 in connection with her bid to immigrate to Canada.

Read the full article at South China Morning Post.
Read more at Canadian Fraud News Inc.

What is insurance fraud? Scheme explained in short animation

Norman Groot

About Norman Groot

Based on my police experience and my experience thereafter as a litigator, I have joined forces with other lawyers with police experience and created the law firm Investigation Counsel Professional Corporation.

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